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​Removing Your Bankruptcy From Credit Reports

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Removing Your Bankruptcy From Credit Reports

The record of your bankruptcy will remain on your credit report for 10 years if you filed under Chapter 7 and for 7 years if you filed under Chapter 13. The anniversary mark is measured from the date of your case filing. Although the bankruptcy should automatically fall from the credit report after this time, often times, it will remain. You can take steps with each credit reporting bureau to remove the record.

Equifax

Step 1
Access the Equifax website's page covering online disputes. The form at the bottom of this webpage asks for a few different pieces of information, such as your name, address and Social Security number. Fill out this form, skipping the credit report number field if you don't have one, and click "Submit."

Step 2
Answer the multiple choice questions asked. These questions confirm you are who you say you are, preventing other people from accessing your report. Click "Submit."

Step 3
Click the bankruptcy’s account name link. Click "Dispute this item." Choose the dispute option stating the account is too old to report. Click the "Add Dispute" option.

Experian

Step 1
Go to Experian's dispute homepage on its website. Order a credit report from Experian, go to Annualcreditreport.com to request a free credit report or use a credit report requested more recently than 90 days ago. Click "Yes, I have a credit report number." Experian requires customers to have a recent credit report before requesting a dispute.

Step 2
Enter the number from the first page of the credit report in the form field. Enter your personal identification information in the other fields and click "Submit."

Step 3
Click the "Dispute this item" link next to the bankruptcy listing. Choose too old to report for your dispute reason. Click "Submit your dispute."

TransUnion

Step 1
Go to the TransUnion webpage dealing with disputes in Resources. Click "First Time? Click Here" and fill out the short registration form if you have not used a TransUnion service in the past. Goback to the main dispute page and click "Returning User" to log in to your account.

Step 2
Click the "Credit Report" option in the navigation bar. Click the "Report Inaccuracy" link that appears once you switch to the Credit Report tab. Click "Submit Dispute" to start your dispute with TransUnion.

Step 3
Scroll down this page and click "Request Investigation" next to your bankruptcy listing. Provide the too old reason to dispute and click "Submit."

Sincerely,

-The 713 Training Teamwww.713Training.com
1-800-535-9984

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